Past Exhibitions

Past Exhibition

Caroline Mytinger was born in 1897 in Sacramento, California. She was a noted portrait artist of important and wealthy Americans during the first half of the 20th century. Her love of adventure and interest in native cultures led her to travel to Guatemala, Haiti, Panama, and eventually to the South Pacific. In 1926 she set out with a friend, Margaret Warner, on a four-year journey to paint portraits of the tribal people in the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea.

Past Exhibition

Markets are meeting places, bringing together diverse people and products. This exhibit explores how people in one country relate to objects through their occupations of producing, selling, and repairing them. The images displayed here were chosen from a collection of about 1,700 photographs taken by anthropologist Richard Lerner in India in 1968-70 and 1988-89.

Past Exhibition

A Century of Collecting examines artifact collecting as a form of cultural representation. All people live their lives surrounded by artifacts. Museum anthropologists collect and preserve these objects so that they can be compared with objects from other places and times, in order to generate broad knowledge about the commonalities and diversity of human cultures. Clearly, the more we know about their original contexts, recorded in documentation such as written notes, maps, or photographs, the better will be our understanding of the people who made and used these artifacts.

Past Exhibition

Tesoros Escondidos presents a selection of the most beautiful, rare, and well-documented objects from Mexico preserved by the Hearst Museum. Although these important pieces have been accumulating since the Museum's founding in 1901, only a few have ever been exhibited before. 

The Aguilar Family teaser image

March 14 - July 1, 2012

The southern Mexican state of Oaxaca is famous for its folk art:  woodcarving and weaving created primarily by men, and a wide range of ceramics, both functional and decorative, made principally by women. This exhibition focuses on the output of pottery by a leading family of makers from Ocotlán de Morelos, the Aguilar family.

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