What We Do and How We Do It

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Organizing the Move

As with most big projects, organization is one of the keys to success. This is especially true when your project is relying on many people, often from different departments, contributing necessary information and preparing objects for a move. The PAHMA move is no exception. The many steps that need to occur must be orchestrated in a specific order for our move to go smoothly, and keeping everyone up-to-date on that progress is integral.

This blog series will discuss the basic organization process implemented by the Archaeology Move Team and will introduce you to the team and the work they are doing. Future blogs in this series will look at the color-coded floor plans and matching cabinet checklists that help to keep everyone updated on progress, as well as motivation tools such as progress-tracking jewel-filled fishbowls. Intrigued? I should think so! But for now, we begin with Part 1 – Work Flow.

Part 1 – Work Flow

In general, the process begins with Registration conducting systematic inventories of all of the cabinets that will be moved and updating the database with the most current information.  Concurrently,

Archaeology volunteer Robert Augostine rehouses artifacts in preparation for their upcoming move.

 

 Collections staff and volunteers are busy rehousing objects to ensure their safe packing  and transport (Figure 1).  Meanwhile, the Museum Archaeologist confirms that the key information for those objects (what the object is, the count, where the object is from) is correct. The inventories and key information entry are integral steps early in the process as the information generated will appear on the barcode for each object.

 

Figure 1. Archaeology volunteer Robert Augostine rehouses artifacts in preparation for their upcoming move.

Archaeology volunteer Chelsea Thommes photographs artifacts and associates barcodes in preparation for the move.

 

Once the locations have been verified and the key information entered, barcodes can be printed.  For the archaeology portion of the move, the barcode is being associated with the object at the photography stage of our process (Figure 2).

 

 

 

 

Figure 2. Archaeology volunteer Chelsea Thommes photographs artifacts and associates barcodes in preparation for the move.

 

Segment of an Acheulian stone collar from Aderg, Mauritania collected in 1967. Note the barcode and catalog number shown clearly with the artifact.

 

That way the barcode and catalog number can be included in the photograph (Figure 3).  After the object is photographed, the barcode is housed with the object to await packing and transport to a new home location.  Stay tuned for future posts on colorful cabinets and sparkly fishbowls! 

 

 

 

 

Figure 3. Segment of an Acheulian stone collar from Aderg, Mauritania collected in 1967. Note the barcode and catalog number shown clearly with the artifact.

 

 

 

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