Preserving the Future

eminor's picture

Seeing artifacts in a new light: 3D imaging of an Egyptian stela

It is a rare occasion to see a favorite artifact truly in a new light. I got that chance while photographing the ancient Egyptian stela of Wepemnofret before its trip to storage. This mortuary monument to Prince Wepie, as we like to call him, is one of the star pieces of the Hearst Museum’s Egyptian collection. The decoration shows him seated before a table of bread, with lists of his worldly titles and desired offerings for his eternal afterlife. The limestone is carved with delicate, low relief that is overshadowed by the uniquely preserved brightly painted details.

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Allison's picture

Archaeological conservator’s top tool?

Meet the wooden skewer, an archaeological conservator’s best friend. At the MVAP conservation laboratory, we frequently use wooden skewers to help stabilize and preserve recently excavated finds from the Etruscan site of Poggio Colla. Humble but versatile, the wooden skewer can work wonders. Conservation staff and students at Poggio Colla use wooden skewers to:

 

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Allison's picture

Block party! Archaeological conservation in action

I’m Allison, a conservator, currently spending a few weeks away from PAHMA to supervise the conservation laboratory at the Mugello Valley Archaeological Project’s (MVAP) Poggio Colla field school. Poggio Colla is an Etruscan site near Florence where students can learn the fundamentals of excavation and contribute to a long-term research project investigating the ancient Etruscans. The conservation staff here works to ensure that the excavated finds are preserved for future study and appreciation.

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