Recent Blog Posts

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Moving Archaeology Towards the Future

The Process: Part 1 - Object Rehousing

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Volunteer Appreciation

 

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Seeing artifacts in a new light: 3D imaging of an Egyptian stela

It is a rare occasion to see a favorite artifact truly in a new light. I got that chance while photographing the ancient Egyptian stela of Wepemnofret before its trip to storage. This mortuary monument to Prince Wepie, as we like to call him, is one of the star pieces of the Hearst Museum’s Egyptian collection. The decoration shows him seated before a table of bread, with lists of his worldly titles and desired offerings for his eternal afterlife. The limestone is carved with delicate, low relief that is overshadowed by the uniquely preserved brightly painted details.

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Conservation on the Move

The move conservation staff works to ensure that objects make it through the relocation process safely, and that move-related activities align with the goal of long-term preservation of the collections. Since moving 1.7 million (!) objects requires a coordinated team approach, the conservators work very closely with our colleagues, including collections managers, registrars, preparators, the photographer, professional art handlers, work study assistants, and volunteers.

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Archaeological conservator’s top tool?

Meet the wooden skewer, an archaeological conservator’s best friend. At the MVAP conservation laboratory, we frequently use wooden skewers to help stabilize and preserve recently excavated finds from the Etruscan site of Poggio Colla. Humble but versatile, the wooden skewer can work wonders. Conservation staff and students at Poggio Colla use wooden skewers to:

 

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